Sunday, May 22, 2011

The Curtains Were Blue


I can't think of anything to post today, but I saw the above photo on Tumblr. As a Literature major, I found it hilarious. Do you agree?

16 comments:

mooderino said...

To be fair, English teachers do need to look like they have some purpose. Once you can read and write that's them pretty much done. After that school is just a way to keep the off the streets.


@mooderino

(Diane) Bibliophile By the Sea said...

LOL......yes, had a lot of teachers reading waybtoo much into the meaning of something! Thanks 4 the chuckle

Tiny Library said...

Haha yes, I've had some English teachers like that :P

Misha said...

Haha So true! I had an English teacher like that :D

Amanda said...

Love it!! Thanks for the morning laugh. :D

lulubelle said...

Hi! That happens, yes. But sometimes, the reader's response is valid, too :) we all give our own meanings to what we encounter in texts. But then again, it's also true that we need to be able to tell when indeed the "curtain is [simply] blue" :) Great blog, by the way!

Kristi said...

This gave me a good laugh. Too funny. Often times the author intends you look beneath the surface, but sometimes we take it a little too far. :)

Zibilee said...

Heh. I totally agree with this post! Though I would like to think that there is a lot of symbolism in the books I read, I have to admit that there probably really isn't. I think authors have a hard enough time writing a really engaging and flowing story without imbuing it all with multiple instances of symbolism.

Story said...

Great post! This is one of the most frustrating parts of my job (as a high school English teacher) because so many of my students have had teachers who tell them what a text means when in fact a teacher's interpretation may not be the only valid interpretation! Instead, I try to get my students to think for themselves. If they think the curtain is blue that is fine; if they read more into it, that can be okay too. I always tell my students that there can be more than one correct answer, but there can also be wrong answers! What each reader brings to the text is very important; reading is an interaction! Sorry for the rant! :)

Jillian said...

Ha ha - yes! I agree. :)

Stefanie said...

Ha! This made me laugh so much. I've had high school and college teachers like this.

Ben said...

Haha. What moody said. I reposed it on my blog and linked here. The fact that's how literature papers are scored according to that kind of steered me away from academic literature.

Carey said...

Bahahahahahaha! :)

Anonymous said...

Yes, I totally agree. Obviously there's sometimes a deeper meaning, but sometimes lit profs read something much deeper into it. So funny.

thezebracactus said...

Reading Dubliners my last year of high school, my professor insisted that the character who lost a pie she had bought while on the train had actually experienced the lose of virginity... we all thought she was just forgetful in regards to purchased baked goods. I still don't know if that was a legitimate interpretation, but that pic reminded me of it!

Stephani-d said...

Great job, Story :) All my english teachers just told us what the symbols were. It wasn't until listening to author John Green on the subject that I appreciated critical reading. http://fishingboatproceeds.tumblr.com/post/25221946175/famous-novelists-on-symbolism-in-their-work-and-whether

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